Tough Dog Beds Chew Proof – Comparison Table

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The-Dogs-Bed-Orthopaedic-Dog-Bed-Large-Brown-Plush-101x64cm-Premium-Waterproof-Memory-Foam-Dog-Bed 101 x 64 x 15 cm Waterproof, Easy to Clean, Anti-Slip See-Best-Price-Blue-Button-PNG-v2 (2)
Lifemax-RSPCA-Extra-Tough-Dog-Rectangular-Bed 70 x 60 x 20 cm RSPCA Endorsed, Removable Inner Pad See-Best-Price-Blue-Button-PNG-v2 (2)
PetFusion-Ultimate-Solid-65cm-Waterproof-Memory-Foam-Pet-Bed-for-Small-Dogs-Cats 91 x 71 x 23 cm Water resistant Cover. Non-skid Base See-Best-Price-Blue-Button-PNG-v2 (2)
Loving-Care-Pet-Products-Ultra-Supreme-LOUNGER-Style-Pet-Bed-XL-100cm-x-80cm-Love-RED-Black-RED-Dog-Bed-Cat-Bed-Basket-Removable-Pillow-Machine-Washable-7-Colours 80 x 65 x 22 cm Hidden ZIps, Reversible Thick Pillow See-Best-Price-Blue-Button-PNG-v2 (2)
JOYELF-Medium-Memory-Foam-Dog-Bed-Orthopedic-Dog-Bed-Sofa-with-Removable-Washable-Cover-and-Squeaker-Toys-as-Gift 97 x 71 x 20 cm Cotton-padded Bolsters for Dog Neck Support See-Best-Price-Blue-Button-PNG-v2 (2)
ChicPet-UK-PREMIUM-Memory-Foam-DOG-BED-Size-LARGE-92x72x23cm-Orthopaedic-Mattress-Waterproof-Scratch-proof-Breathable-Cotton-Cover-Removable-Washable-Easy-to-Clean-Grey 73 x 47 x 23 cm Washing Machine, Or Can be Spot Cleaned See-Best-Price-Blue-Button-PNG-v2 (2)

When searching for tough dog beds that are chew proof , it is important to remember that Chewing is natural and can be caused by a number of many things. These can include boredom, hunger, anxiety, and more.

The good news is that your dog’s bed doesn’t have to be all chewed up and unsightly if you choose wisely!

You will struggle to find a dog bed that cannot be destroyed however getting a tough, chew proof or chew resistant dog bed and should live longer than conventional beds by a long distance.

How to Stop a Dog from Chewing his Bed

Dogs chewing and digging into their beds is a common canine phenomenon.

Despite a lot of research into it, it is still not definitively known what a dog’s motivation may be for the physical assault on his bed. It is widely accepted that this behaviour is seen in many dog-loving homes around the globe. 

There are a loads of reasons why your canine friends dig, circle, bite, or chew their beds. Understanding what motivates your dog and how he deals with his bed will help you to better understand him and what his actions is providing for him.

Some dogs chew and dig into their beds because they are bored. In the absence of other more exciting things to do, dogs will create their own fun. 

Anxiety-Induced Dog Bed Chewing

Destructive dog bed chewing can also be related to stress-related behaviour.  If your dog suffers from separation anxiety, or if it is as a result of something in his environment that makes him nervous or uncomfortable – these kinds of stress related catalysts can easily drive your dog to compulsively chew his dog bed.

Redirection, toys, and deterrents on their own will not resolve stress-related dog bed chewing:

  1. Identify and then eliminate stressors that set off your dog. This is the most efficient solution for destructive bed chewing, but the triggers may lie beyond your control. If the presence of small children or other pets upsets your dog, then establish new boundaries to make him feel more secure. Many dogs exhibit noise-related anxiety which is particularly difficult to control if it comes from outside your home (thunder, fireworks, neighbourhood traffic, etc.). Try moving your dog’s bed to a different location in the house and remind family members to stay calm during noisy disturbances rather than adding to the commotion.
  2. Use a synthetic dog appeasing pheromone product.  These type of dog pheromones are popular and can be used to treat any number of stress related issues. They come in several forms including dog coats, collars, plug-in diffusers, sprays, and individually wrapped wipes. They are odourless and mimic the natural calming pheromones mothers release for their puppies. Be advised it takes time for the pheromones to work and you must reapply them monthly.
  3. Leave on a television or radio when you’re gone. This strategy can have a calming effect on an anxious dog throughout the day. Music albums composed and recorded specifically to soothe dogs may also be effective.
  4. Engage in behavior therapy. This more involved strategy may be necessary for dogs with extreme anxiety. Consult your vet and consider looking for specialists in your area.

At What Age Does a Puppy Have Control Over its Bladder?

At What Age Does a Puppy Have Control Over its Bladder?

In a way, young puppies can be compared to growing newborns. Both of their bodies are still developing, growing, and changing, even after they leave the womb. 

For instance, newborns will often develop their immune systems last, which is why it is crucial to keep them away from places where they can get sick.

You can compare this to the way that puppies do not have fully developed muscles around their bladders. Because of this, puppies will encounter more accidents, this despite the efforts you put into their house training. Knowing when your puppy has control over its bladder is an important step in housetraining any dog.

How Long Does it Take?

In the very beginning, puppies are physically unable to hold themselves for more than an hour. This means that if you are not taking your puppy out every hour, you can expect to find an accident somewhere, which can be problematic when you are at work or asleep. This will last for the first month or so of the puppy’s life.

After about two months, your puppy will be able to hold itself for closer to two hours. Over time, your puppy’s bladder muscles will develop as the puppy grows and matures. You best option during this process, is to get some puppy training pads to assist in keeping your home clean as your puppy grows.

Typically, after about four to six months, your puppy will have full control over its bladder. What this means, however, is that you can expect to encounter accidents here and there until that time comes, no matter how well housetrained your puppy might appear to be.

Avoiding Accidents as Much as Possible

Because puppies develop their bladder muscles relatively slow, this means that accidents in your house are going to be inevitable. As unfortunate as this might be, now that you know this, you can start taking the measures necessary to prevent as many of the accidents as you can.

When you are away from the house, consider having someone take the puppy for walks. Set alarms to take your puppy out. Set up a puppy pad that you can carry your puppy to.

Finally, be patient with your puppy throughout this process, as it is learning and trying its best to improve.

What to Do When Your Dog Has a Loss of Bladder Control After Neutering?

incontinence products

Many people choose to neuter their dogs for a variety of reasons. Most of these people can also agree that neutering a dog provides a variety of benefits to the dog’s life but there are some downsides to getting your dog neutered as well. For example, there is always a chance of your dog developing some issues with bladder control.

When diagnosed properly, this is commonly referred to as hormone-responsive urinary incontinence and, as the name would suggest, it is often caused by the change in hormones after neutering. It can last for up to a year after the neuter, meaning that you should be well prepared to take care of your dog if this happens.

Because urinary incontinence is relatively common in dogs, there are many, many solutions available for you to choose from. Whether you want to consider giving your dog medication or you want to make sure that you have supplies on hand to prevent and minimise accidents, you will surely find a solution that fits both you and your dog.

Many people aren’t always comfortable giving their dogs medicine, which makes other incontinence solutions even more popular.

incontinence products

What Solutions Are There?

Generally, hormone-responsive incontinence will happen most when the dog is lying down. This happens for a few reasons but one of the biggest reasons is the fact that there is more pressure on the bladder.

The increased pressure on the bladder and the change in hormones combined can end up causing bladder leaks in your dog. This means that your dog’s bedding will become soiled far more often. 

Solely for this reason, you should consider getting a dog incontinence blanket. 

Below are a list of the best dog blankets available to buy today. All fully machine washable, combining luxury and versatility.  

SmartPetLove - Snuggle Blanket P&L Superior Double Fleece Blanket Nobby Fleece Plaid Dog Blanket Gor Pets Nordic Dog Blanket
smart P&L Superior Pet Beds Double Thickness Sherpa Fleece Blanket, Large, 150 x 100 x 1 cm, Beige/Black Nobby Fleece Plaid Super Soft Blanket Gor Pets Nordic Blanket for Dog
25.4 x 21.6 x 7.6 cm 150 x 100 x 1 cm 39.5 x 34.9 x 8.5 cm 150 x 100 x 3 cm
Machine Washable Machine Washable Machine Washable Machine Washable
See-Best-Price-Blue-Button-PNG-v2 (2) See-Best-Price-Blue-Button-PNG-v2 (2) See-Best-Price-Blue-Button-PNG-v2 (2) See-Best-Price-Blue-Button-PNG-v2 (2)

These blankets are usually designed to be absorbent, breathable, and washable to ensure that when your dog leaks, it will not be disturbed by the wet spot. When the dog gets up, you will be able to easily wash the blanket before your dog goes back to sleep.

If your dog has a more severe case of hormone-responsive incontinence that causes your dog to leak urine at any given time, you might want to consider getting something that will keep your dog from having accidents in the house. Just as human babies wear nappies until they are potty-trained, a nappy can help your dog with its incontinence issues.

Not only will the nappy prevent accidents in the house but dog nappies are designed to be absorbent, meaning that your dog’s skin and fur won’t be as affected by the leakage. A dog nappy can keep your dog happy and relatively healthy until the hormone-responsive urinary incontinence is relieved.

Why Should You Consider a Solution?

Aside from the fact that cleaning up after an incontinent dog’s accidents is no fun for anyone, a dog that has incontinence issues is generally not too happy. Having to sleep in a bed that has urine stains is uncomfortable. Having fur stained with urine and stool is not only uncomfortable for the dog but it can also cause some skin problems as well.

Nobody wants this to happen as it will cost even more time and money to treat.

Choosing to minimise your dog’s accidents is the best thing that you can do for your dog if it loses control of its bladder due to neutering.

Incontinence in your elderly dog.

urinary tract infection in dogs

Dog urinary incontinence and urinary tract infections occur in 2% to 3% of all dogs and that percentage increases if you own an elderly dog.

It is usually caused by a bacterial infection that has entered the body through the urethra, the tube that carries urine out of the body. If the infection is able to take hold, it colonises in the urinary tract, eventually making its way to the bladder causing a bladder infection.

Infection in the urinary tract causes inflammation which reduces the size of the urethra and makes the tube narrower, making it more difficult to urinate. Since less urine passes through the body, other problems can set in such as urinary or bladder stones. The urine contains crystals which form into stones. As these crystals attach to one another forming stones, additional blockages and urination problems can occur.

The urine itself is natures way of keeping the urinary tract infection free. If your elderly dog isn’t urinating enough, or there are other problems in the body that changed the PH balance or composition of the urine, it reduces the urine’s bacteria-killing effectiveness.

Incontinence in your elderly dog.

 

Symptoms of dog bladder problems

Symptoms of a urinary tract infection in an elderly dog are usually related to problems with urination due to inflammation of the urinary tract. These include:

  • Difficulty Urinating
  • Pain when urinating
  • Frequent urination
  • Urine leaking
  • Urination in unacceptable places
  • Urine odour
  • Licking of the area where your dog urinates

Causes Of Dog Urinary Incontinence

There are several different reasons for why old dogs have these problems, including:

Hormonal Changes in Female Dogs

Old dog incontinence can be the result of a hormone imbalance.

Most common are low levels of estrogen in female dogs, especially those who have been spayed.

Scientists are still not sure whether or not early-spaying (between 6 weeks and 6 months old) increases the chances of this type of incontinence

Older male dogs can suffer from testosterone-related incontinence too, whether they’ve been neutered or not.

Some breeds seem to be at a higher risk of this happening, they include spaniels (of different types), Old English Sheepdogs, Doberman Pinschers and Boxers.

Spinal Or Neurological Problems

If your old dog has vertebrae, disc or spinal issues, or neurological problems, then they can cause her to lose control of her bladder.

This is because the nerve signals from her brain to her bladder are not working properly, or aren’t getting through at all.

You’re more likely to see this if your dog is long-bodied (like the Dachshund), or short-legged (like the Corgi), or a combination of both (like the Basset Hound).

However, dogs that have arthritis and other joint problems and injuries need a walkabout harness that allows your pet lead a happier, healthier and cleaner life

Disease Or Illness

There are a few different conditions that can cause your old dog to start peeing more often, or to lose control of her bladder.

The most common ones include diabetes (usually results in excessive thirst, followed by a predictably excessive amount of urination). It also includes kidney or liver disease, polyps or cancerous growths in the urinary tract, or prostate, bladder stones.

Infection

A urinary tract (UTI) or bladder infection can cause your elderly dog to lose control of her bladder because the need to pee is so strong. It usually also makes her need to pee much more often than normal and leave you looking for the right products to buy.

But incontinence which is being triggered by something else can also cause a UTI. It’s sort of a ‘the-chicken-and-the-egg’ situation.

Bladder infections are more often seen in female dogs than in males and affect all ages.

Usually causes some discomfort or even pain for your dog because of the urine burns and itches. Sometimes she’ll strain really hard, but only be able to pass only a drop or two of pee-pee.

Elderly Dog Syndrome

This is another name for ‘Canine Dysfunction Syndrome’, and it can affect senior dogs in a wide variety of different ways.

Then there are endocrine disorders such as Cushing’s Disease and Addison’s Disease.

Canine Cognitive Dysfunction (basically this is the dog equivalent of human Alzheimer) can lead to old dog incontinence problems too.

That’s because dogs with CCD can ‘forget’ the house training habits they’ve known since they were puppies.

Sometimes they’ll have periods when they’re kind of ‘spacey’ and not really at the moment… and that can lead to random urination episodes.

Psychological or emotional issues like extreme stress or anxiety can also trigger old dog incontinence, although usually on a more temporary basis.

Older dogs can get stressed and anxious quite quickly, and even what might seem like a small change to you can upset your dog more than you would expect.

And last, but not least, the ageing process itself often means that muscles, nerves and organs don’t work as well as they used to.

Lack of muscle-tone or weak nerve impulses can cause a loosening of the bladder sphincter (the muscle at the ‘neck’ of the bladder, which holds it closed) and cause your dog to unintentionally dribble urine.

 

Urinary: Female Dog Incontinence

Incontinence

Incontinence in female dogs is a phrase used to refer to involuntary urination, night or day. The issue can have many causes which influence the body’s ability to shut off the flow of urine, or when the bladder overflows. These may include urethra muscle control issues, and issues common to all dogs including infection and stone formation.

It is a complex process where the brain transmits the sensation that the bladder is full with the knowledge to give your dog the sensation that it need to urinate by coordinating the muscles that controls urination in the brain (PMC center).

Female Dog Incontinence occurs when the urinary systems isn’t regulating the flow of urine properly.

In younger female dogs (and some males) a condition called ectopic ureters is the most common cause. This is a condition where there is a problem where the tube that leads from the kidney – the ureters – doesn’t attach correctly to the bladder.

Female dog incontinence may be inherited or triggered by spaying. After spaying the illness usually occurs 3 years after being neutered, but can occur up to ten decades.

Dog's Urinary Tract incintinence

Dog Breeds Affected by Urinary Incontinence:

While this could be a problem in all breeds, it is most often seen in:

  • English Bulldog
  • Newfoundland
  • Siberian Husky
  • Retrievers (Labrador and Golden)

Many times, the problem is diagnosed after other causes of incontinence like disease, cystitis (bladder inflammation) and canine cognitive dysfunction are ruled out.

Other causes are less common. These include thickening of the bladder wall, structural problem where the ureters ( lead from the kidneys to the bladder), enters the bladder (ectopic ureters), neoplasia (tumour or unusual cell growth) and some form of paralysis in the urinary system.

Medical direction is widely used and is suitable for nearly all affected animals. Surgical remedies are also described: operation is used for patients that are refractory to medical management or for young animals where the health effects or cost of long-term medication is of concern to the owners.

Treatment options include the use of prescription drugs and surgery. There’s also a homeopathic natural approach which may provide temporary relief as stated below.

Medications

Prescription medications include oestrogen treatment and a class of drugs called sympathomimetic agents (Phenylpropanololamine). Medications can work by helping the muscle that closes off urine in the urethra increase the amount of pressure it uses when shutting off the flow of urine. Most dogs won’t experience side effects, and if they do, they include restlessness, anxiety, aggressive behaviour and diarrhoea.

Surgery

Surgery is used if a dog does not respond well to medications or if you prefer this option. The objective of surgery is to move the bladder into a better position. There are numerous surgical techniques available which can be discussed with your vet (colposuspension, urethropexy, urethral sling suspension, and injection of collagen). There’s a high rate of success with this approach (80% increase, 50% treated).

There are natural homeopathic remedies know to ease incontinence and strengthen the bladder. 1 product that’s a fantastic source of further research is PetAlive Better-Bladder Control. It contains components such as:

Bacterial infection is the most common type of disease and is usually found in female puppies as they have a brief urethra (tube that carries urine from bladder to outside of body). If not treated the bacteria can colonise up the urethra, to the bladder, and then go from the bladder to urethra into the kidneys (pyelonephritis).

Urine is your body’s natural means of keeping a disease from forming and thus preventing female dog rash. Urea, the principal ingredient in pee, kills germs in the bladder and the whole tract. When your dog does not drink enough or if there is an obstruction, the stream of urine is not able to perform its job. Even walking your dog once every day will encourage an extra chance for your dog to urinate.

To deal with infection your vet will prescribe antibiotics. As a homeopathic addition to antibiotics or as a preventative you may try UTI-Free Formula for pet urinary tract infections. Certain organic ingredients are related to urinary support. Cranberry juice tablets may also be of help for incontinence in female dogs because it functions to keep bacteria from clinging to the walls of the bladder.

Stones tend to form when there’s a buildup of minerals which attach together in the urine.

As stones become bigger, they can start to block the flow of urine. Other symptoms may include blood on your dog’s urine and pain when urinating. In severe cases like if the ureter is obstructed (tube that leads from the kidney to bladder), your dog may vomit and act lethargic.

Diagnosis is accomplished by assessing the urine, x-rays and by feeling your dog during the trip to the vet. Ultrasound could also be beneficial. In puppies, struvite formation is related to bacterial infection.

Urate stones can be dissolved with the drug allopurinol. Your vet may also indicate a change to a low protein Diet that could help prevent these kinds of stones from forming. The other kind of stone, struvite is connected with dogs which also have a fungal infection. These kinds of stones can be dissolved by changing to a special diet such as Hill’s Prescription Diet s/d. This diet will have to be the only thing that your dog eats for a period of 3 to 6 weeks.

Other Reasons For Female Dog Incontinence

In elderly dog’s a condition known as canine cognitive dysfunction may be the cause for female dog rash. It’s a neurological condition where you dog can’t effectively control the bladder.

In young dogs, a birth defect exists that leads to rash called ectopic ureters. The ureters in puppies are what moves urine from the kidneys to the bladder. One or both may by-pass the bladder and link to some other place like the vagina or urethra. If that is true a young puppy may undergo urinary problems like dripping urine. There are several breeds where there is an above average incidence of the problem including:

Female dog incontinence due to dog ectopic ureters is diagnosed with a bladder dye research. The problem is treated with surgery to move the ureters to their proper location.