Pros And Cons Of Belly Bands For Dogs

Belly bands for dogs are often used to deal with urinary incontinence. Often prescribed to male dogs, they are the ideal choice when dealing with potty training, spot coverage or urine marking within the house.

Urinary incontinence is a condition that affects dogs of all ages, breeds, or gender. It is often seen in dogs that are middle-aged and older and not often come as a surprise to house trained dogs. Belly bands are an easy way to deal with it without breaking the bank.

Are belly bands safe for dogs? Unlike dog nappies that sometimes lead to skin burns, dog belly bands are safe for dogs to use. They do come with a number of caveats though as dog belly bands are often not used for female dogs or for dealing with faecal incontinence in dogs.

Pros And Cons Of Belly Bands For Dogs

How do Dog Belly bands Work?

Dog Belly Bands wrap around your dog’s midriff and are often made from soft polyester fabric with a comfortable fleece lining. This outer lining is wrapped around your dog’s middle area and can be swapped out when urine leaks have occurred. A belly band is great for giving an extra layer of support to your dog.

It is important to remember that exercise is a great easy and cheap option to have when dealing with a dog dribbling urine or peeing uncontrollably around the house.

For times when life gets in the way and you are unable to take your dog for a walk or run as frequently as you want, this dog agility bridge is a great option to have in the garden. Helping improve your dog’s movement, balance and fitness getting an agility bridge like this would also help avoid the frequency of your dog lying indoors and suddenly seeing a puddle in the same spot.

Why do you Need a Belly Band for Your dog?

Some of the reasons why you might be considering a belly band for your dog include;

  • Urinary Incontinence
  • Back Injury
  • Illness
  • Housetraining
  • Temporary disability after surgery
  • Sometimes, the initial signs of urinary incontinence in dogs can be missed. Signs that include – randomly dribbling or leaking urine, Wet spotting on the dog bed and ammonia-like smell on the dog’s bedding.

Prior to seeing your vet (the first thing to do when you notice random urine spots), a belly band is a quick short term option to avoid additional accidents around the house.

Cranberry juice is also used for dogs by dog owners prior to the first trip to the vet. A natural herbal remedy for incontinence and UTI ailments in dogs.

Pros Of Belly Bands For Dogs

  • Dog belly bands are often fully waterproof. They are usually supplied with an external layer made using organic materials, as well as a soft absorbent internal layer.
  • They are flexible, lightweight and ergonomically designed allowing for a great fit around your dog as well as significantly reducing the risk of leakages
  • They are a great option for potty training.
  • Belly bands are supplied with Velcro fastening making them easy to put on and take off at the drop of a hat. Also makes it more difficult for your dog to slide them off
  • Belly bands can easily be machine washed or washed by hand, making them a cost-effective one time purchase.
  • Three layers of moisture-resistant fabric
  • They often come in a wide number of fabric patterns and designs, so you have a wide range to pick from.
  • The price. The consistently decent brands of dog belly bands are made by Glendarcy and Teamoy. They are often in the price range of between £20 – £25 but you can’t go wrong with them.
  • Dog Belly Bands are especially unique because the band simply wraps around the crotch area and does not extend to the butt area or tail.

Cons Of Belly Bands For Dogs

  • They can only be used on male dogs. If you have a female dog with faecal or urinary incontinence then a dog nappy is the one to choose.
  • The inner linings are usually white. After a number of uses, these can start showing urine marks. Not great, but on the flip side, they can’t be seen when worn by dogs.
  • Due to how absorbent they are, it can be easy to miss when your dog has had an accident and peed. So ensuring you take them off before you let the dog out is a must.
  • The sizes need to be crosschecked to ensure you don’t choose one too big or too small for your dog.
  • Bacteria thrive in wet damp environments, so the belly bands need to be checked and swapped out when possible.
  •  They can sometimes roll up at the edges, but this often varies from one dog to another.

Dog Nappies – What’s the difference?

Dog nappies are usually worn by both male and female dogs. Dog nappies are great as they allow dogs to regain some independence around the home without you having to worry about their spot marking. They are also great at helping them avoid unwanted accidents.

When a female dog uses a dog nappy during her heat cycle, the dog nappy collects the discharge of blood. Hence why a dog belly band would not work.

Dog nappies often come as disposable or washable and reusable. Disposable dog nappies, as the name implies are often used and binned. They are less of a hassle to deal with and in the short term can seem cheaper to begin but it is worth noting that the costs can easily keep rising if you lose track.

Disposable dog nappies are also not renowned for being as leak-proof as washable nappies but they are decent short-term choices.

Dog nappies can be life-savers to have handy when going on a long-distance trip to visit friends and family and dog urine is not welcome. They are also good to have when flying or travelling by train, as journeys like that can make your dog more anxious and lead to urine dribbles.

These downsides to these modes of transportation is that they do not make it easy to potty your dog. They also do not make it easy for you to have access to your dog to change the nappy. If that’s the case, you should seriously consider getting a proper transport box for your dog. They are stable, strong incredibly lightweight. They also come lined and have thermo – blankets that provide your dogs with warm protection against the cold.

Planning ahead is important to avoid having to complicate something that started out as a simple issue. So if you do get a proper transport crate for your dog, then you should get your dog used to it gradually and gently.  You should start by leaving the door open and allowing your dog to relax inside at home well before your trip.

The next phase would then be to move on to closing the door for short periods and gradually increase this time. It is then important to try some short outdoor test trips before attempting a long journey. Whatever you do, it is important that this dog crate should never be used as a punishment, and should be a positive, safe hideaway for your pet.

If cost is a daunting issue and you want other options for dog nappies, then consider getting human baby nappies for your dog instead of specific disposable dog nappies. A tail hole will still need to be cut into the nappy, but that ‘s the only hard work required.